Special Coverage

ONE-STOP-SHOP: Press conferences, stats, links related to COVID-19

This is your one-stop-shop guide to everything you need to know about the impact of COVID-19.

  Trail Of Hope - The Struggle To Vote

  Trail Of Hope - The Struggle For Equality

  Trail Of Hope - The Journey To Equality

Gov. Edwards declares state of emergency ahead of Tropical Storm Gordon

Moncrief

Airport Gambling

Continued Coverage

  Bear spotted in EBR neighborhood captured and sent back to wildlife refuge

Election Video: 9:30pm-10:00pm

Election Video: 9:00pm-9:30pm

Election Video: 8:30pm-9:00pm

Election Video: 8pm-8:30pm

  VIDEO: Election Update 7:00pm

Update from WAFB 9News.

  VIDEO: Election Update 7:55pm

WAFB 9News update.

Craft Breweries

Brewers Bash will feature specialty beers from the nine breweries, Irish pub food and a chance for guests to meet brewery owners and staff. The national Brewers Association states that Louisiana ranks second to last in breweries per capita. By Annie Ourso | LSU Student

Job Fair

College seniors with prospective degrees in technology and engineering have heard they are heading into a hot job market. But the prospects for LSU students who are seeking other degrees are not always as clear. By S. Renee Barrow

State Hospital

Tiger Racing

Broussard

LSU Greek Diversity

Tinker

News Future

Bernstein

Journalism means something different today, in an age of partiality and pre-conceived notions, and the news media need return to the "basic notions" that made American journalism great, Pulitzer Prize winner Carl Bernstein told Manship School students. By Jonathan Olivier

Tiger Eye

If Eric Fasbender is doing his job, fans will never notice. Yet thousands of LSU Tiger fans admire his handiwork every Saturday at Tiger Stadium. His department makes certain all Tiger athletic fields are pristine. By Lauren Myers

Leslie Dill

Words don't have to use a traditional narrative form to tell stories, and Lesley Dill attempts to prove this in most of her multi-media art. The visual artist brought examples of this language to the LSU Museum of Art. By Austen Krantz

Best LA Hikes

Being closer to nature, relishing the wonders of the woods, or simply getting away from it all are easy goals to achieve when on a good hiking trail. Five hikes have been singled out as the best. By Jonathan Olivier

LSU Grad Certificates

A new materials science and engineering graduate certificate program at LSU is designed to give students an interdisciplinary edge in academics and careers. Instead of earning a master's degree, one receives a certificate. By Olivia McClure

Take Back Night

The IRIS Domestic Violence Center of Baton Rouge says the city has experienced at least five victims of fatal domestic violence since September 2012. More than 100 people came together to remember abuse victims Sunday night. By Wilborn Nobles III

Sweatshops

Two former sweatshop workers are urging LSU students to organize in opposition to the use of sweatshop labor to make athletic logo wearing apparel for universities. By Gordon Brillon

Crime Stats

Overall, the number of on-campus crimes committed at LSU and Southern University did not increase significantly in 2012, according to the universities' annual security reports. Law enforcement officials at the two Baton Rouge campuses cite better student awareness as the primary reason. By Olivia McClure

RAD

A ring of armored women roared in support of their classmate while she battled against a would-be attacker during the fall session of the Rape Aggression Defense (RAD) program on the LSU campus. By Christian Rachal

BREC Program

An outdoor outreach program, called BREC Out, offers at-risk youth in East Baton Rouge Parish schools that may need help academically the chance to participate in outdoor-oriented team building activities in class and on field trips. By Jonathan Olivier

Ag Leaders

After nearly half a century at LSU, College of Agriculture Dean Kenneth Koonce retires Oct. 7 and will be replaced by Vice President for Agriculture Bill Richardson, reuniting the LSU Ag Center's research and extension with the college's academic program. By Olivia McClure

Cancer Tech

Newly installed equipment at the LSU Center for Advanced Microstructures and Devices (CAMD) will allow for more in-depth cancer research that focuses on using x-rays to target malignant cells while leaving healthy tissue unharmed. By Jonathan Olivier

Sand Volleyball

LSU Tiger fans will have something new to cheer come March 2014 when the LSU sand volleyball team joins the 20 existing varsity Tiger sports. By Lauren Myers

Black Bear

State and federal officials are preparing to make a decision at the beginning of 2014 to remove the Louisiana black bear as a threatened subspecies under the Endangered Species Act. By Jonathan Olivier

LSU Dairy

The LSU AgCenter and the University's separate dairy programs will consolidate, causing some operations at the campus dairy farm on Gourrier Avenue in Baton Rouge to scale down and move to the AgCenter's Southeast Research Station in Franklinton, La. By Olivia McClure

New Magazine

According to a 2012 study by the Center of Disease Control, 34.7 percent of adult residents of Louisiana have a body mass index above 30, classifying them as obese. Baton Rouge Health and Fitness Magazine is trying to change that. By Lauren Myers

Voting Regs

Voters across Louisiana will head to the polls on October 19 for open primary elections. Mississippi will hold elections soon after on November 5. But other than sharing one of the highest voter registration rates in the nation – 84 percent of eligible voters, say election officials – the ease of voting differs vastly in the two states. By Amy Whitehead

Chimp Haven

Nestled in the pine trees of northern Louisiana, 22 miles southwest of Shreveport, is Chimp Haven, a 200-acre habitat that is home to 169 chimps from around the nation. By Taylor Balkom

Zeagler Music

Rapidly improving technology is creating problems for many locally-owned music stores, laments Fred Zeagler, owner of Zeagler's Music in Baton Rouge. By Josh Bergeron

Exonerees

The Innocence Project of New Orleans is responsible for 22 exonerations in Louisiana and Mississippi since its founding in 2001. However, exoneration is not sufficient to restore what once was. By Otisha Paige

FBI 2

FBI agents remain adamant they are making their best efforts to bring justice to decades-old Civil Rights era murders, although they acknowledged cases get tougher by the year as suspects and witnesses die of age-related ailments. By Kevin Thibodeaux

Appointments

Just before leaving their respective positions under pressure, LSU System President John Lombardi and System General Counsel Ray Lamonica wrote letters of appointment to select staff members in Jan. 2012. By Chris Grillot

LA Queer

College students from around the state, donning rainbow flags and multicolored hair, descended on LSU for the third annual Louisiana Queer Conference this past weekend. By Joshua Bergeron

DWF Fallen

Since the agency's founding in 1872, seven Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries (DWF) agents have lost their lives in the line of duty – all but one since 1991. By Albert Burford

Frank DeLaughter

Newly declassified FBI documents show the late Concordia Parish Chief Sheriff Deputy Frank DeLaughter claimed to have reformed after he was released from prison. By Kevin Thibodeaux

Bryan Monroe

Bryan Monroe, editor of CNNPolitics.com, advocated in a speech at Southern University, a news media coverage shift to increase fairer representation and coverage of African-Americans. By Albert Burford

Jindal Suit

For the past two years, the LDWF Commission has had a lawsuit set to file in an attempt to halt the governor's office from sweeping of dedicated funds out of DWF's Artificial Reef Program to the general fund. By Kevin Thibodeaux

Hearts and Hooves

On 24 Mondays a year, volunteers and a group of friendly horses help physically and mentally disabled people improve their strength, balance and confidence. By Kayla Reed

Field House

LSU's College of Human Sciences and Education is working to bring the decrepit Huey P. Long Field House back to its former glory. But it isn't the only one. By Joshua Bergeron

Tony Brown

Journalist and television host Tony Brown encouraged students to not only study hard and make good grades, but maintain strong character when he spoke at Baton Rouge Magnet High School. By Albert Burford

Civil Rights

Surviving family members of victims of Civil Rights murders consider Keith Beauchamp a champion. He investigates forgotten and current cases, making documentaries designed to bring closure to those families. By McKenzie Womack

Med School

Pennington Biomedical Research Center is seeking to open a four-year medical school focused on research, and the idea has drawn tentative support from the LSU System Board of Supervisors. By McKenzie Womack

Bike Trip

Will Adams of Augusta, Ga., is riding a motorized bicycle from his hometown to the southern-most city in the world – Ushuaia, Argentina – to raise awareness about a lack of clean water in developing nations. By Joshua Bergeron

Hansen's Disease

Once relegated to the outskirts of society, the National Hansen's Disease Program, centered in Baton Rouge, is attempting to bring the disease more commonly known as leprosy to the forefront of the public's attention. By Kevin Thibodeaux

Ernest Parker

In 1964, Ku Klux Klan activist James Ford Seale beat two black teenagers in Franklin County, Miss., forced them into a car and later killed them by throwing them into a Louisiana offshoot of the Mississippi River. By Andrea Gallo

Wharlest Jackson Murder (Bombing Sidebar)

By Morgan Searles | LSU Student NATCHEZ -- When the sounds of an explosion reached the Natchez, Miss., home of Wharlest and Exerlena Jackson, an 11-year-old boy tore out the back door, grabbed his bicycle

Wharlest Jackson Murder (FBI Sidebar)

By Brian Sibille | LSU Student Agents with the Federal Bureau of Investigation spent tens of thousands hours investigating the Feb. 27, 1967, Klan-directed murder of Wharlest Jackson in Natchez in that

Wharlest Jackson Murder

Newly declassified FBI documents detailing the investigation into the murder of Wharlest Jackson reveal Raleigh J. (Red) Glover, leader of the violent KKK-offshoot Silver Dollar Group, was the FBI's main suspect. By Kevin Thibodeaux and Brian Sibille

Scott

In a case of stolen – then mistaken – identity, a 21-year-old former LSU Athletic Department employee was shot by an FBI agent and died in his own driveway in 1973. By Parker Cramer

Alcohol

Since a new ordinance went into effect allowing the sale of alcohol by the drink until midnight on Sundays, one businessman has brought in an additional day of revenue for one of his clubs. By Emily Bell

Town Hall

LSU Interim System President and Chancellor William Jenkins sought to quell the chaos among the university community about a proposed reorganization of the statewide system. By Brian Sibille

Diversity

Student enrollment for African Americans at LSU this fall totalled 2,835 compared to 21,568 caucasian students. Observing foot traffic in LSU's Quad reinforces the makeup of the student body. The diversity gap is apparent. By Otisha Paige

Memorial

LSU architecture and ceramics student Nathan Drake was only 21 years old when he died from cancer in March. Eight months later, he is embedded in the minds of many at the Baton Rouge campus. By Catherine Threlkeld

UREC Holiday

Several Baton Rouge and campus organizations and individuals donated time and resources for the LSU Staff Senate's 23rd annual "Holiday on Campus" on the day that has been nationally dubbed "Giving Tuesday." By Emily Bell

Beatings

During the waning hours of Feb. 13, 1964, Raleigh "Red" Glover of Vidalia parked his car in the middle of the B.B. Beard Road near Monterey, Louisiana, propped open the hood and waited. By Ben Wallace

Hurricane

"Hurricane Story," a collection of 46 photos and titles, describes the birth of Jennifer Shaw's first son and the two months she and her husband took leave from New Orleans. By Morgan Searles

Evacuation Redeux

LSU EOC core committee chairwoman D'Ann Morris took responsibility for what many students and faculty members deemed a lack of clear communication in the Sept. 17 evacuation of the campus. By Andrea Gallo

FBI

Twenty of the 112 cases – representing 27 deaths, five in Louisiana and 10 in Mississippi – reactivated under the FBI's Cold Case Initiative more than five years ago remain open. By Andrea Gallo

Numbers

The purpose of a football player's uniform is to identify him on the field, but a few choose it to identify themselves, but for others, the number is either traditionally assigned or selected at random. By Luke Johnson

Montgomery CC

As the only female mayor of Ferriday -- serving one term from 1994 to 2000 – Odeal Montgomery is one of only three African Americans to hold that position. By Morgan Searles

Cage Ride

In a unique custom that is an integral part of the LSU football game day experience, 16 LSU cheerleaders kick-start the LSU crowd by circling the Tiger Stadium turf atop a trailer before each home game. By Luke Johnson

Summit

Democratic pundit James Carville brought journalists, academics and political experts back to his home in Louisiana Thursday during the Bipartisan Policy Summit's fourth annual Political Summit.

Closed Cases

Five civil rights-era murder investigations in Louisiana and 10 in Mississippi are among the more than two dozen that will remain open and active, according to a U.S. Department of Justice report. By Kevin Thibodeaux

LSU's Got Talent

Participating in an LSU student talent competition can offer more than name recognition. It could also mean the opportunity, win or lose, for free studio recording time. By Emily Bell

Rowing

While slicing through turbulent waters, the males of LSU's rowing club need all the motivation it can get, especially last weekend. Danielle LeBlanc has sought to provide that. And no, she's not a cheerleader. By Alex Cassara

Honore

He was the "John Wayne" of New Orleans, the "overnight hero" of Hurricane Katrina, and "exactly what the Gulf Coast needed," to hear the newscasters tell it.

Hate Groups

Nationally, organized hate is alive and well, and anyone who believes differently needs only an Internet connection and a computing device to find out just how close the nearest Louisiana chapter is located. By Ben Wallace

Banned Books

This year marks the 30th anniversary of the observance of banned books in America — a celebration of literature and the freedom for one to read what one pleases. By Ferris McDaniel