Angola lifts precautionary boil water advisory

(Source: WAFB)
Published: Aug. 11, 2022 at 5:22 PM CDT|Updated: Aug. 15, 2022 at 5:25 PM CDT
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UPDATE:

The following is a press release from Louisiana State Penitentiary:

BATON ROUGE, La. (WAFB) – The Department of Corrections (DOC) has rescinded a boil water advisory it issued last Thursday for Louisiana State Penitentiary. Over the weekend, contractors made repairs to the prison’s water storage tanks and water tests were negative for bacteria, allowing the DOC to lift the advisory.

The DOC placed the prison under a boil water advisory after small leaks were found in the roofs of the prison’s two water tanks. These leaks could have potentially been a passage way for contaminants. A boil water advisory is a precautionary measure issued by the water utility company to alert customers when there is a potential for compromised water quality.

The Louisiana Department of Health performs bacteria tests on Louisiana State Penitentiary’s water samples twice a month for coliform and other contaminants. The most recent tests, over the weekend, were negative. In addition, the prison tests its water system daily for chlorine residual levels to ensure those levels meet or exceed state regulations. Chlorine residual in a water system helps to prevent bacterial growth in the lines. The results of the chlorine residual tests continue to be above the mandated standards. Over the past two years, the prison has not received any water quality violations from the Department of Health.

The recent boil water advisory at Louisiana State Penitentiary impacted the entire prison, including B-Line, the neighborhood where prison employees live. The prison is provided bottled water for inmates and employees who were on duty at the prison for the duration of the boil water advisory.

ORIGINAL:

The following is a press release from Louisiana State Penitentiary:

Out of an abundance of caution, the Department of Corrections issued a boil water advisory at Louisiana State Penitentiary on Thursday, Aug. 11.

The advisory is a result of small leaks found in the roofs of the prison’s two water tanks. These leaks could potentially be a passageway for contaminants. Emergency repairs to the leaks are expected to be completed over the weekend. The prison will remain under a boil water advisory until repairs to the water tanks are completed and sample results are negative for bacteria.

The Louisiana Department of Health performs bacteria tests on Louisiana State Penitentiary’s water samples twice a month for coliform and other contaminants. The most recent tests, on Monday, came back negative. In addition, the prison tests its water system daily for chlorine residual levels to ensure those levels meet or exceed state regulations. Chlorine residual in a water system helps to prevent bacterial growth in the lines. The results of the chlorine residual tests continue to be above the mandated standards. Over the past two years, the prison has not received any water quality violations from the Department of Health.

The boil water advisory impacts the entire prison, including B-Line, the neighborhood where prison employees live. The prison is providing bottled water for inmates and employees who are on duty at the prison for the duration of the boil advisory.

A boil water advisory is a precautionary measure issued by the water utility company to alert customers when there is a potential for compromised water quality. It is recommended that customers boil all water used in the preparation of food and beverage for consumption for one minute after the water comes to rolling boil.

This includes water used for:

  • Drinking water (including pets)
  • Brushing teeth
  • Baby formula
  • Washing produce
  • Preparing food
  • Coffee, tea, lemonade, etc.
  • Ice cubes should be thrown out

It is ok to continue to use tap water for laundry, showering/shaving, and watering grass or plants without boiling.

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