Join the walk to end violence, murder, trafficking of women of color

This comes as a new Louisiana law was passed Monday saying that law enforcement employed for one year or more has to get training on how to recognize human traf
Published: Aug. 4, 2022 at 5:42 AM CDT
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BATON ROUGE, La. (WAFB) - Officials are trying to fight human trafficking, not only nationally, but in Baton Rouge.

This comes as a new Louisiana law was passed Monday saying that law enforcement employed for one year or more has to get training on how to recognize human trafficking.

You can meet at the Baton Rouge Police Department headquarters on Airline Highway at 1:30 p.m.

There is a community awareness walk happening Thursday, August 4. It’s called the “My Sister’s Keeper Walk” and aims to end violence, murder and trafficking of women of color.

You can meet at the Baton Rouge Police Department headquarters on Airline Highway at 1:30 p.m. At 2 p.m., they’ll walk to the East Baton Rouge Parish Main Library on Goodwood Blvd.

Frantz Beasley started this walk in Los Angeles, California on May 16. He’s been traveling across the country doing this walk. The goal in every community is to bring everyone together. That’s why he’s coming to Baton Rouge to bring community members, survivors, organizations, law enforcement, policymakers and local government to discuss some of the issues here at home.

“It’s also to remind people that this can also happen to anyone,” said Frantz Beasley with the My Sister’s Keeper Walk.

“One of the things that I’ve learned that’s most fascinating across this walk has been for some reason we kind of get into a safe space where we feel that I think subconsciously it could not possibly happen to us and there are countless stories. These families didn’t do anything wrong often times to make murder happen or no one thinks they’re raising their child to be trafficked.”

The locations Beasley is going to are driven by numbers and statistics. He read several reports of high trafficking numbers in Houston, Texas because of I-10. He wanted to come to Baton Rouge since it’s right along that line.

They are using this walk to gather as much information as they can and see where the gaps are in each community.

“One of the most important things is that they have a voice,” said Nicole Valenzuela with Respect Our Daughters. “That these are not just statistics on paper, that these are actual human lives and communities that are impacted by these issues. Being able to come together to create the space to be able to begin to have conversations, begin to be comfortable in uncomfortable conversations to be able to really start to address the issues and listen and learn from one another and we can see the strengths that we all have and begin to work together to find solutions.”

She said 42% of all victims of human trafficking that have been identified are African American.

From Baton Rouge, Beasley will work his way up to the east coast, 4,300 hundred miles in total.

The “My Sister’s Keeper Walk” aims to end violence, murder and trafficking of women of color.
The “My Sister’s Keeper Walk” aims to end violence, murder and trafficking of women of color.(East Baton Rouge Parish Library)

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