Denham Springs puts moratorium on new large developments

Denham Springs city leaders believe they need to update their infrastructure before they start building new large residential properties.
Published: Apr. 27, 2022 at 6:00 PM CDT|Updated: Apr. 27, 2022 at 6:07 PM CDT

BATON ROUGE, La. (WAFB) - Denham Springs city leaders believe they need to update their infrastructure before they start building new large residential properties.

Michael Piron says it seems like the city of Denham Springs has grown overnight. After losing so much of his home, like many others, back in the 2016 flood, Piron believes the city is not able to handle any more large influxes of residents.

“I believe we are kind of at a critical mass right now. When it comes to what we’ve got for all of our infrastructure, whether it be utilities, water, schools, drawn on city resources, police department fire, etc.,” explained Piron.

Piron is not the only one who believes that.

The Denham Springs City Council decided on Monday, April 25, 2022 to put a moratorium—or a hold—on any more large developments focusing mainly on residential properties.

“We will not accept any larger developments, what we will accept up to smaller developments of say 10 house or smaller. Obviously, if somebody bought a piece of property and they are in the district or inside the city, and it’s a single-family home…we are more than welcome to have them join the system,” explained Denham Springs Mayor Gerard Landry.

Mayor Landry says the reason why they are doing this is that any new large developments could put a strain on their sewage plant.

“Well, when the sewer plant was built back in 2008, it was a 4 million gallon a day capacity, which is a nice size plant, but we are currently two and half 2.6 million gallons per day. With the proposed developments it was going to push us a little over 3 million gallons a day,” said Landry.

Denham Springs city leaders believe they need to update their infrastructure before they start...
Denham Springs city leaders believe they need to update their infrastructure before they start building new large residential properties.(WAFB)

Anytime someone washes their hands or flushes the toilet it goes to a water waste system. During this moratorium, Landry says they will be being in experts to conduct a study to see what are their best options to update the plant.

“We all want to be here for a lot longer, we all have things that we would like to get done. The sewer issue is just one of those bumps in the road that we have to handle and we will,” added Landry.

The moratorium will last until Dec. 31.

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