FIRST ALERT FORECAST: Rains get an early start on Monday, more through midweek

FIRST ALERT FORECAST: Sunday, July 26 - 10 p.m.

BATON ROUGE, La. (WAFB) - Our gloomy weather pattern continues for at least a few more days. Showers and t-storms remain likely each day Monday through Wednesday, with the main upside being a break from the heat.

Future radar (HRRR model) valid at 7 a.m. Monday showing scattered to numerous showers and t-storms impacting the area early on Monday.
Future radar (HRRR model) valid at 7 a.m. Monday showing scattered to numerous showers and t-storms impacting the area early on Monday. (Source: WAFB)

Much like Sunday, rains will likely get an early start on Monday. Showers and t-storms are expected to fire along the coast and gradually build inland overnight. Rain chances are posted at 50%-60% by daybreak, so the morning commute could be a bit messy to start out the final week of July. Off and on rains are likely through at least lunchtime, but the early start may once again result in a somewhat quieter afternoon and evening. Highs are once again expected to only reach the low 80°s.

Speaking of afternoon temps, Sunday's high of 83° in Baton Rouge tied a record cool high for the date (July 26) that was last set 120 years ago (1900)! Our forecast high for Monday is 82° and that would tie the record cool high for the date last set in 1978.

10-day forecast for the Baton Rouge area as of Sunday night. Rain chances are expected to remain elevated through Wednesday.
10-day forecast for the Baton Rouge area as of Sunday night. Rain chances are expected to remain elevated through Wednesday. (Source: WAFB)

While our rainy pattern continues through Wednesday, we finally expect a drier pattern to arrive by the end of the week. Thursday's rain chances top out at 40% and drop to 20% by Friday. Unfortunately, rain chances look to once again rebound by the time we reach the weekend.

In the tropics, Hanna continued to produce flooding rains over south Texas and northern Mexico as of late Sunday. It was finally downgraded to a tropical depression at 4 p.m. on Sunday and the mountainous terrain of Mexico should result in more significant weakening on Monday.

Tropical weather outlook issued by the National Hurricane Center at 7 p.m. Sunday. An area of low pressure dubbed Invest 92L is given a 90% chance of development.
Tropical weather outlook issued by the National Hurricane Center at 7 p.m. Sunday. An area of low pressure dubbed Invest 92L is given a 90% chance of development. (Source: WAFB)

Elsewhere, the large, broad area of low pressure dubbed 'Invest 92L' located about midway between Africa and the Lesser Antilles was given a 90% chance of development by the National Hurricane Center as of late Sunday. It is likely to reach the Lesser Antilles as a tropical depression or storm by midweek, but it is too soon to speculate where it may end up after that.

Radar image captured at 9:25 p.m. CDT Sunday night by a radar in Molokai, Hawaii as Hurricane Douglas passed very close to the islands. If it were to make landfall in Hawaii, it would be only the third hurricane on record there since 1949.
Radar image captured at 9:25 p.m. CDT Sunday night by a radar in Molokai, Hawaii as Hurricane Douglas passed very close to the islands. If it were to make landfall in Hawaii, it would be only the third hurricane on record there since 1949. (Source: WAFB)

Finally, Hanna is not the only tropical system impacting the US this weekend. Hurricane Douglas is skirting along the northern coast of several Hawaiian islands Sunday night. Hurricane landfalls are rather uncommon in Hawaii, with about 70 years of reliable records only showing two landfalls in the state. It will be a close call on whether or not landfall actually occurs, but squally weather with gusty winds and elevated surf will continue into Monday regardless of the exact track.

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