Tea for infants, breastfeeding women could contain Salmonella

Tea for infants, breastfeeding women could contain Salmonella

(WAFB) - A brand of herbal tea marketed to help relieve digestive discomfort in infants and increase milk flow in women who are nursing could potentially be contaminated with Salmonella, a U.S. Food and Drug Administration announcement states.

Mountain Mel’s brand is recalling The Milk Lady’s Tea, Peaceful Baby Herbal Tea, and Diges-Teas Herbal Tea sold nationwide through Azure Standard, Mountainmels.com and Amazon.com between June 27 and July 20.

The products were made with recalled fennel seed. Essential Goods ceased production and distribution of the recalled products on July 20.

Product descriptions can be found below:

  • The Milk Lady’s Herbal Tea Blend, UPC 7 99632 05658 4, is packaged in a tall thin tin container with 2 oz of tea per tin, with a purple label. The LOT# of the recalled batch is # ML6271950. The LOT# can be located on the bottom of the tin package. The Best By Date of the Milk Lady’s Tea is listed as 7/2021.
  • Peaceful Baby Herbal Tea Blend, UPC 7 99632 05656 0, is packaged in a tall thin tin container with 2 oz of tea per tin, with a blue label. The LOT# of the recalled batch is #PB781950. The LOT# can be located on the bottom of the tin package. The Best By Date of the Peaceful Baby Tea is listed as 7/2021.
  • Diges-Teas Herbal Tea Blend, UPC 7 99632 05665 2, is packaged in a tall thin tin container with 2 oz of tea per tin, with a brown label. The LOT# of the recalled batch is #DT7619100. The LOT# can be located on the bottom of the tin package. The Best By Date of the Diges-Teas Herbal Tea is listed as 7/2021.

Consumers who have purchased the recalled product are urged to take a photo of the product and lot label, email that to info@mountainmels.com for a full refund.

It is helpful to remember the following symptoms of Salmonella infection:

  • Most people infected with Salmonella develop diarrhea, fever, and stomach cramps 12 to 72 hours after being exposed to the bacteria
  • The illness usually lasts 4 to 7 days, and most people recover without treatment
  • In some people, the diarrhea may be so severe that the patient needs to be hospitalized. Salmonella infection may spread from the intestines to the bloodstream and then to other places in the body
  • In rare cases, Salmonella infection can cause death unless the person is treated promptly with antibiotics
  • People more likely to get a serious illness are children younger than 5 years, adults older than 65 years, and people who have health problems or take medicines that lower the body’s ability to fight germs and sickness

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