Measles cases climb to 704 for the year, highest since 1994, CDC says

There were 78 new cases last week

CDC reports surge in measles cases

ATLANTA (Gray News) – America’s measles outbreak shows no signs of slowing down.

The number of confirmed cases across the country is now 704, up 78 over the last week, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

This is the nation’s worst year for measles since 1994 and eight months still remain in 2019. There were 963 cases in 1994.

The 22 states that have reported cases to CDC are Arizona, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kentucky, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Missouri, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Oregon, Texas, Tennessee, and Washington.

The number of confirmed cases across the country is now 704, up 78 over the last week, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
The number of confirmed cases across the country is now 704, up 78 over the last week, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)

Many of the reported cases are from New York with 390 confirmed cases of measles in Brooklyn and Queens and since October. Most of these cases have involved members of the Orthodox Jewish community. Another 202 have been reported in Rockland County.

The CDC recommends the vaccine for everyone over a year old. People who have had measles are immune.

The vaccine became available in the 1960s and is considered safe and highly effective. Measles was declared all but eliminated in the U.S. in 2000. But it has made comebacks since then, including 667 cases in 2014.

“There is no treatment or cure for measles, and there is no way to predict how bad a case of measles will be,” CDC Director Robert Redfield tweeted Monday. “Some children may have very mild symptoms but others can face more serious complications, like pneumonia and encephalitis.”

Here’s what we know about the measles outbreaks in the United States:

  • The majority of people who got measles were unvaccinated.
  • Measles is still common in many parts of the world including some countries in Europe, Asia, the Pacific, and Africa.
  • Travelers with measles continue to bring the disease into the U.S.
  • Measles can spread when it reaches a community in the U.S. where groups of people are unvaccinated.

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