Correction: Western Wildfires story - WAFB 9 News Baton Rouge, Louisiana News, Weather, Sports

Correction: Western Wildfires story

(Jerry McBride/The Durango Herald via AP). In this Tuesday, June 12, 2018, photograph, hot spots glow after sunset near the Falls Creek Subdivision as the 416 Fire burns near Durango, Colo. (Jerry McBride/The Durango Herald via AP). In this Tuesday, June 12, 2018, photograph, hot spots glow after sunset near the Falls Creek Subdivision as the 416 Fire burns near Durango, Colo.
(Jerry McBride/The Durango Herald via AP). In this Tuesday, June 12, 2018, photograph, Sandy Elliott follows her putt while playing a round of golf with Marlene Gebhardt at Dalton Golf and Country Club with the 416 Fire burning behind them near Durango... (Jerry McBride/The Durango Herald via AP). In this Tuesday, June 12, 2018, photograph, Sandy Elliott follows her putt while playing a round of golf with Marlene Gebhardt at Dalton Golf and Country Club with the 416 Fire burning behind them near Durango...
(Jerry McBride/The Durango Herald via AP). In this Tuesday, June 12, 2018, photograph, a sign is posted to show that there is no access because of wildfires to San Juan National Forest on County Road 124 north May Day near Durango, Colo.. (Jerry McBride/The Durango Herald via AP). In this Tuesday, June 12, 2018, photograph, a sign is posted to show that there is no access because of wildfires to San Juan National Forest on County Road 124 north May Day near Durango, Colo..
(Jerry McBride /The Durango Herald via AP). In this Tuesday, June 12, 2018, photo, smoke envelops a helicopter as it is used to battle a wildfire near Durango, Colo. (Jerry McBride /The Durango Herald via AP). In this Tuesday, June 12, 2018, photo, smoke envelops a helicopter as it is used to battle a wildfire near Durango, Colo.

DENVER (AP) - In a story June 13 about wildfires, The Associated Press reported erroneously the name of a resident who witnessed a fire in Moab, Utah. His name is Steve Clark, not Tim Clark.

A corrected version of the story is below:

'Like dominoes': Utah homes burn as wildchfires menace US West

A brush fire raced through a neighborhood in the Utah tourist town of Moab, destroying eight homes as nearby states struggled with blazes that threatened homes

By COLLEEN SLEVIN and LINDSAY WHITEHURST

Associated Press

DENVER (AP) - A fast-moving brush fire destroyed eight homes in the Utah tourist town of Moab, while more than 3,000 people in Colorado and Wyoming fled multiple wildfires scorching the drought-stricken U.S. West on Wednesday.

The blaze in Moab, known for its dramatic red rocks, started in a wooded area Tuesday night and quickly spread to homes over less than a square mile (kilometer), Police Chief Jim Winder said. Crews were extinguishing embers Wednesday.

Moab residents Steve Clark and his girlfriend Tina Saunders grabbed their dogs, family photos and a laptop, evacuating with their home in flames.

"Those houses just started going like dominoes," Clark told the Salt Lake Tribune. "Bam! Bam! Bam! Bam!"

Police said the early investigation has ruled out natural causes for the blaze that ignited near a creek that is frequently used as a walkway in a largely blue-collar neighborhood. It was not near the tourist-heavy areas in the town known for its proximity to Arches and Canyonlands national parks.

Moab resident Shane Tangren told the newspaper that he arrived home from work Tuesday evening to find flames nearby. He was trying to protect the house he's lived in since he was 16 by wetting it down, but the wind shifted and sent the flames barreling right toward him. He fled.

"I sat there and watched it burn to the ground," Tangren, 55, told the newspaper. "Everything - photographs, birth certificates, memories - it's all gone. My first car - that was a 1970 (Pontiac) GTO. Up in flames. I bought it when I was 15."

In Colorado's mountains, residents have evacuated more than 1,300 houses - condos, apartments and pricey homes - as flames threatened an area known for its ski resorts. Firefighters, with help from aircraft, got a quick jump on a fire near Silverthorne after it was reported Tuesday and have managed to keep it from spreading beyond about 91 acres in heavy timber, including trees killed by pine beetles.

Summit Fire Chief Jeff Berino said Wednesday night that lightning did not play a role in the fire and that "some type of human element is probably likely" as a cause.

Across the state, Colorado's largest fire has burned about 43 square miles (111 square kilometers) over nearly two weeks. Residents could go back to about 180 homes no longer threatened at the northern edge of the fire Wednesday, but others remained out of more than 1,900 houses.

The blaze about 13 miles (43 kilometers) north of Durango is in the Four Corners region where Colorado, New Mexico, Arizona and Utah meet and which is in the middle of a large swath of exceptional drought. Much of the U.S. West is experiencing some level of drought.

Colorado Gov. John Hickenlooper said the rapid response from emergency crews has helped prevent a repeat of devastating wildfires in 2012 and 2013. Years ago, he said fire departments were hesitant to commit resources to fighting every fire, and launching a coordinated response to a major blaze could take up to two days.

Hickenlooper said better coordination has cut down on delays, and the state reimburses local departments for initial response costs, in an attempt to control a blaze before it can spread.  

"We learned a lot from the disasters, the fires we had in 2012 and 2013," Hickenlooper told reporters. 

Meanwhile, a wildfire in Wyoming's Medicine Bow National Forest doubled in size over 24 hours, burning about 8 square miles (21 square kilometers). Nearly 400 seasonal and permanent homes have been evacuated because of the fire near the Colorado border.

The fire has destroyed some structures, but investigators have not said how many or what type.

The situation was better in central Washington, where authorities lifted evacuation orders or warnings for about 50 residents as crews work to contain a wildfire burning grass and brush.

Officials said one small outbuilding was lost but no injuries have been reported.

___

Whitehurst reported from Salt Lake City. Associated Press writers Bob Moen in Cheyenne, Wyoming, and Brian Eason and Thomas Peipert in Denver contributed to this report.

Copyright 2018 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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