LSU alum is trainer for horse competing in Kentucky Derby - WAFB 9 News Baton Rouge, Louisiana News, Weather, Sports

LSU alum is trainer for horse competing in Kentucky Derby

Tom Amoss and Lone Sailor (Source: lsualumni.org) Tom Amoss and Lone Sailor (Source: lsualumni.org)
BATON ROUGE, LA (WAFB) -

An LSU alumnus has a big connection to the Kentucky Derby. He's the trainer for one of the horses racing, Lone Sailor.

Lone Sailor is owned by the Benson family and has odds of 50:1 for "America's Greatest Race." Other horses with odds like that have won though, including Mine That Bird in 2009 and Giacomo in 2005.

Tom Amoss is a passionate trainer and an LSU Tiger.

Amoss has a 30-year training career. He was born in New Orleans and fell in love with horse racing as a young boy. He began his career in high school as a stable hand for Hall of Fame trainer, Jack van Berg. He earned his trainer's license in 1987.

He has seen more than 3,500 victories in his career, with close to $1 million in earnings. Amoss has nine lead trainer titles and 25 major stakes victories. He was inducted into the Fair Grounds Racing Hall of Fame in 1998.

Lone Sailor beat the odds to even qualify for the Kentucky Derby. Lone Sailor is named for the late Tom Benson, former owner of the Saints, who won the Lone Sailor Award from the Navy in 2007. 

Geaux Lone Sailor!

Copyright 2018 WAFB. All rights reserved.

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