FIRST ALERT FORECAST: Afternoon heat, showers expected Wednesday - WAFB 9 News Baton Rouge, Louisiana News, Weather, Sports

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FIRST ALERT FORECAST: Afternoon heat, showers expected Wednesday

First Alert Weather (Source: WAFB) First Alert Weather (Source: WAFB)
BATON ROUGE, LA (WAFB) -

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It was a mainly dry Tuesday across the WAFB area, and we are expecting much the same for Wednesday.

Maybe the biggest local weather story for Tuesday was the repeat presence of Saharan dust, giving a hazy look to the high sky and pushing the AQI into Code Orange, meaning the air is unhealthy for sensitive groups, because of the unusually high amount of particulates. This is only the second time since publishing AQI forecasts and conditions that the Baton Rouge area has reached Code Orange due to particulates. Both events have occurred this summer and both were prompted by the Saharan dust.

After a morning start in the low to mid 70s under generally fair skies, the heat and humidity will be back in full force for Wednesday afternoon. Highs will reach the mid 90s for many WAFB neighborhoods with the Heat Index running at 100° or more for several hours. Yet as is typical in August, we can expect a few afternoon t-showers to pepper the landscape. Set rain chances at 20 to 30 percent for Wednesday afternoon.

The high pressure pattern that has been responsible for our recent run of drier weather will give way to a return to scattered afternoon rains as we head into Thursday, Friday, and the weekend. Rain chances will be rebounding to 40 to 50 percent or better from Thursday into Sunday. Even so, afternoon high temperatures will still manage to make it into the 90s for most WAFB communities just about every day through the weekend.

In the tropics, the National Hurricane Center (NHC) is still watching an area in the central Atlantic, recently tagged as Invest 98L, which has been given a modest 40 percent chance for tropical development over the next two to five days. More importantly, the forecast track keeps it over open water, meaning it should not be a threat to land.


MORE:

+ Drought Monitor for Louisiana

+ Drought Monitor for Mississippi


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