Post-storm sunset produces stunning scenery - WAFB 9 News Baton Rouge, Louisiana News, Weather, Sports

Post-storm sunset produces stunning scenery

Source: WAFB Source: WAFB

As the heavy rain, lightning and flood waters pushed out southeast Louisiana and parts of the Mississippi Gulf Coast Sunday, the severe weather left behind a trail of undulating stratocumulus clouds that triggered an amazing sunset.

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Sunsets tend to be most brilliant when there’s clean air — like the kind that’s been washed of pollution by heavy rain — and mid- or high-level clouds for the sun’s rays to bounce off of.

Near Clinton, homes flooded and over a dozen people needed rescuing.

At least one tornado touched down in Pascagoula, Ms. and water pushed into homes in Long Beach, just west of Gulf Port.

But as the sun set on Sunday evening, social media lit up with bright streaks of reds, pinks, and oranges.

Viewers even submitted some of their own sun-soaked canopies.

And the clean air, which is the main ingredient to bright and colorful sunsets, extended all the way to Colorado, where Rick Tillery snapped this awe-inspiring sunset.

A post shared by Mark Bienvenu (@msbphoto) on

The scarlet skies seemed to personify a Dylan Thomas poem: Do not go gentle into that good night ... Rage, rage against the dying of the light.

Copyright 2017 WAFB. All rights reserved.

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