Study confirms what you already suspect: Eating fries often is a - WAFB 9 News Baton Rouge, Louisiana News, Weather, Sports

Study confirms what you already suspect: Eating fries often is a bad idea

Eating fries at least twice a week could increase your risk of death, according to a study published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.  (Source: Pixabay) Eating fries at least twice a week could increase your risk of death, according to a study published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. (Source: Pixabay)

(RNN) – Put down the fries. Or at least eat them a little less frequently.

Eating fries at least twice a week could increase your risk of premature death, according to a study published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.

The study looked at the potato consumption habits of 4,000 people between 45 and 79.  By the end of the eight-year study, 236 participants had died. 

It found that those who consumed fried potatoes two to three times a week or more “were at an increased risk of mortality.”

It added that eating unfried potatoes was not associated with a higher mortality risk.  

The authors emphasize more studies with a larger number of participants should be conducted "to confirm if overall potato consumption is associated with higher mortality risk." 

Copyright 2017 Raycom News Network. All rights reserved. 

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