YOUR TURN: LSU Recruiting Class - WAFB 9 News Baton Rouge, Louisiana News, Weather, Sports

YOUR TURN: LSU Recruiting Class

Source: WAFB Source: WAFB
BATON ROUGE, LA (WAFB) -

This week’s Your Turn segment goes to Conrad Naquin. Naquin and others went to our Facebook page to discuss their excitement about the job that LSU head football coach Ed Orgeron and his team did with the recruiting class of 2017. The school landed a group of recruits ranked in the top 10 in the nation and Naquin thinks Orgeron deserves the credit. In his words:

That’s why he’s so successful. Players love his passion of football. That's how he coaches - with passion. His assistant coaches also coach with passion. They love the game so much and players love that about a coach. He's a great teacher. I played against his high school team with him and Bobby Hebert. They won the 1977 state championship that year. He's just a winner and that's what makes him great.

That’s Conrad Naquin’s turn. Now it’s your turn. To comment on this segment or anything else, visit us on Facebook or send an email to yourturn@wafb.com.

Copyright 2017 WAFB. All rights reserved.

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