OUR TURN: North Baton Rouge ER - WAFB 9 News Baton Rouge, Louisiana News, Weather, Sports

OUR TURN: North Baton Rouge ER

BATON ROUGE, LA (WAFB) -

Congratulations to state and local leaders, the people at Our Lady of the Lake, community organizers and everyone else who contributed to the outcome that is bringing a new emergency room to North Baton Rouge.

Ground was broken Tuesday for the new facility on Airline Highway adjacent to Our Lady of the Lake’s urgent care clinic. Residents in North Baton Rouge have gone for more than a year without an emergency room in their area following the closure of the ER at Baton Rouge General’s Mid City campus.

That sparked a debate over many issues, but there was little disagreement that people who live in North Baton Rouge felt like they were losing access to important health care services. For them, the new facility represents a new beginning.

Trauma patients will still be transported to the Level Two trauma center at Our Lady of the Lake on Essen Lane, but a closer emergency room does have the potential to save lives in other types of medical emergencies. For that, we are grateful.

That's "Our Turn." Now, it's your turn. To comment on this segment or anything else, visit us on Facebook or send an email to yourturn@wafb.com.

Copyright 2017 WAFB. All rights reserved.

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