OUR TURN: Comite River Diversion Canal Project - WAFB 9 News Baton Rouge, Louisiana News, Weather, Sports

OUR TURN: Comite River Diversion Canal Project

BATON ROUGE, LA (WAFB) -

The state’s legislative auditor last week completed his report on the status of the Comite River Diversion Canal project. This is a tale of woe which reveals the absolute worst about government efficiency.

While there is disagreement about how helpful the canal would have been in the August flood, the consensus is that many homes would have been spared if it had been completed. The auditor’s report now formally raises the question about whether it should be completed, whether it should be reviewed as part of a more comprehensive plan, or even if it should be scrapped altogether.

Folks, here is what cannot happen. We cannot wait nine years to come up with another plan. That’s how long it took start the Comite Canal project. Most importantly, we cannot fool around for 25 years trying to finish a canal that everyone agreed was a good idea. The disaster of the flood creates a sense of urgency we must act on. Every day that urgency subsides, and before you know it 33 years passes and nothing’s been done.

That's "Our Turn." Now, it's your turn. To comment on this segment or anything else, visit us on Facebook or send an email to yourturn@wafb.com.

Copyright 2017 WAFB. All rights reserved.

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