OUR TURN: New Year's Resolution - WAFB 9 News Baton Rouge, Louisiana News, Weather, Sports

OUR TURN: New Year's Resolution

BATON ROUGE, LA (WAFB) -

There’s a lot of power and energy in the changing of the calendar. It rolls over to a new year and we set our personal agendas to do better in the 365 days ahead - our New Year’s resolutions.

For 2017, let’s resolve to be more positive about this place where we live, work and play. This past year has been an incredibly challenging one for our community on many different levels, but it is extremely encouraging to see so many people rolling up their sleeves to tackle the tough issues that face us.

There’s no way to sugar coat difficult problems, but there is a way to think about this place where we live with a more positive attitude. And there are virtually an unlimited number of ways that we as individuals can pitch in to make our home here a better one.

That's "Our Turn." Now, it's your turn. To comment on this segment or anything else, visit us on Facebook or send an email to yourturn@wafb.com.

Copyright 2016 WAFB. All rights reserved.

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