OUR TURN: Mayor Kip Holden's lasting legacy - WAFB 9 News Baton Rouge, Louisiana News, Weather, Sports

OUR TURN: Mayor Kip Holden's lasting legacy

BATON ROUGE, LA (WAFB) -

As the year concludes, so does the final term of Kip Holden as East Baton Rouge Mayor-President.

Holden was criticized for his leadership in the wake of the flood and the police shootings, but prior to that, he amassed a generally well-regarded record as a public servant.

Holden was first elected to the Metro Council 32 years ago, and has served in various elected positions since then, capped by his 12-year tenure as mayor-president. He will be probably remembered best for his role in helping revitalize downtown Baton Rouge.

While the credit for that does not go exclusively to him, it’s indisputable that our downtown area has become a much more dynamic place since Holden took office. He is quick to note that downtown only had one hotel when he took office as mayor-president. As he leaves office, it will have 12 along with other attractive places to live, work and play.

For his successful efforts as our mayor-president, we are grateful to Kip Holden.

That's "Our Turn." Now, it's your turn.

To comment on this segment or anything else, visit us on Facebook or send an email to yourturn@wafb.com.

Copyright 2016 WAFB. All rights reserved.

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