YOUR TURN: Deputy Nick Tullier's recovery - WAFB 9 News Baton Rouge, Louisiana News, Weather, Sports

YOUR TURN: Deputy Nick Tullier's recovery

Source: WAFB Source: WAFB
BATON ROUGE, LA (WAFB) -

This week’s Your Turns goes to Brian Stock.

Stock went to our Facebook page to comment on the coverage of the medical progress of Deputy Nick Tullier. Tullier is the East Baton Rouge Parish Sheriff's deputy who was critical wounded in July in an attack on law enforcement. He is in Houston now, at a renown facility that specializes in rehabilitation and research. Stock is pleased with Tullier's recovery.

In his words:

The press conference today left me tremendously inspired and in awe of God's miracle of healing and the monumental spirit of Nick and the tremendous character of his father, James Tullier. I'm very proud to say I back the blue. Good men are free because of better men than themselves. 

That was Bryan Stock’s turn, now it's your turn. To comment on this segment or anything else, visit us on Facebook or send an email to yourturn@wafb.com.

Copyright 2016 WAFB. All rights reserved.

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