OUR TURN: Rep. Graves on FEMA trailer issues - WAFB 9 News Baton Rouge, Louisiana News, Weather, Sports

OUR TURN: Rep. Graves on FEMA trailer issues

BATON ROUGE, LA (WAFB) -

“Idiotic .” That’s the word U.S. Representative Garret Graves used to describe FEMA’s process for helping our area’s flood victims.

Specifically, Congressman Graves said that FEMA was spending too much money for the mobile homes it’s providing to flood victims and taking too long to get them in place. So far, FEMA has only been able to help about half of the families on the waiting list for mobile homes, and officials say some people will be waiting until the end of January.

Congressman Graves is most upset about the price of those mobile homes. According to an article in the Advocate, FEMA is spending well over $100,000 for each installed mobile home and a local dealer here says he could provide a home of equal quality installed for less than $40,000.

As a nation, we’ve simply got to get better at dealing with disasters. This was not our first catastrophe requiring a large housing recovery plan and it will not be our last. Our government leaders must do a better job of learning from the past and planning for the future.

That's "Our Turn." Now, it's your turn. To comment on this segment or anything else, visit us on Facebook or send an email to yourturn@wafb.com.

Copyright 2016 WAFB. All rights reserved.

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