YOUR TURN: FEMA - WAFB 9 News Baton Rouge, Louisiana News, Weather, Sports

YOUR TURN: FEMA

Source: WAFB Source: WAFB
BATON ROUGE, LA (WAFB) -

This week’s Your Turns goes to Rebecca Ramsey.

Ramsey is one of many people who reacted on our Facebook page to a recent  WAFB investigators story about FEMA’s performance in helping people left homeless by the flood. She and many other people are still in a great need of help and are not happy with FEMA.

She says in her own words:

These systems should be in place beforehand. I have never seen such a disorganized waste of money. It’s been four months and you can’t even get a FEMA employee on the phone who knows what is actually going on . We applied September 9 and still nothing. Literally, not even any kind of status. Not even an approval. The $6,000 that I was given for losing everything including in my vehicle is now gone because the expense of day-to-day “temporary living” costs a fortune. I could go on and on. There is no excuse for this.

That was Rebecca Ramsey’s turn, now it's your turn. To comment on this segment or anything else, visit us on Facebook or send an email to yourturn@wafb.com.

Copyright 2016 WAFB. All rights reserved.

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