OUR TURN: Comite Diversion Project - WAFB 9 News Baton Rouge, Louisiana News, Weather, Sports

OUR TURN: Comite Diversion Project

BATON ROUGE, LA (WAFB) -

The time is now to complete the Comite River Diversion Canal project. If this year’s flood did not create enough urgency to get this done, what level of unimaginable disaster would we have to have to move it forward?

To be clear, completion of the canal would not have prevented most of the flooding and destruction that we suffered in August, but there is great consensus that it would have helped many people. Beyond that, this issue has been studied for more than 30 years, and all of that research has not produced a better idea.

Yes, there are many other smaller things we can do to prepare for the next flood, but this major project should not have to wait for the next flood before we finally take action. In our 9News special report last night, Congressman Garret Graves suggested working around the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to get this done. We support him and our other local leaders and any of their reasonable plans which can move this project forward.

That's "Our Turn." Now, it's your turn. To comment on this segment or anything else, visit us on Facebook or send an email to yourturn@wafb.com.

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SPECIAL REPORT: Delayed Diversion

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