YOUR TURN: Bike Safety - WAFB 9 News Baton Rouge, Louisiana News, Weather, Sports

YOUR TURN: Bike Safety

Source: WAFB Source: WAFB
BATON ROUGE, LA (WAFB) -

This week’s Your Turn segment goes to Angie Timberlake.

Timberlake saw our story on the police search for a hit-and-run driver who struck and injured a bicyclist this week. She went to our Facebook page to comment on it. In her words:

I wish someone would consider a campaign to educate both motorists and bicyclists as far as safety is concerned. In the past week, I've had three near run-ins with bikes in Mid-city. One, on a sidewalk going the wrong way; a second when someone tried to cross in front of me at a stop sign; and a third in the street going the wrong way. My car insurance agent told me there is no circumstance in which a motorist would win a lawsuit brought on by an injured bicyclist, no matter how many laws he broke.

That’s Angie Timberlake’s turn. Now it’s your turn. To comment on this segment or anything else, visit us on Facebook or send an email to yourturn@wafb.com.

Copyright 2016 WAFB. All rights reserved.

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