Exclusive Poll: Trump holds strong lead over Clinton in Louisian - WAFB 9 News Baton Rouge, Louisiana News, Weather, Sports

Exclusive Poll: Trump holds strong lead over Clinton in Louisiana

(Source: WAFB | Raycom | Mason-Dixon Polling & Research) (Source: WAFB | Raycom | Mason-Dixon Polling & Research)
(Source: WAFB | Raycom | Mason-Dixon Polling & Research) (Source: WAFB | Raycom | Mason-Dixon Polling & Research)
Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump during their respective rallies in Baton Rouge. (Source: WAFB) Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump during their respective rallies in Baton Rouge. (Source: WAFB)
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BATON ROUGE, LA (WAFB) -

An exclusive WAFB | Raycom Media poll shows Donald Trump with a 20-point lead over Hillary Clinton in Louisiana with just two and a half weeks until the presidential election.

In a survey that was conducted from Monday, Oct. 17 until before the final debate was held Wednesday, Oct. 19, 625 Louisiana voters were asked who they would support if the election was held right now. 

Voters polled statewide gave Donald Trump a commanding lead of 54 percent to Hillary Clinton's 34 percent. 

"The last two times out, the Republicans have gotten 60 percent of the vote in Louisiana with John McCain in 2008 and Mitt Romney in 2012, so it's really not a surprise," said political analyst Jim Engster. 

Breaking down the poll by region, 55 percent of the voters in the Baton Rouge area picked Trump while 36 percent went with Clinton and 6 percent remained undecided. 

However, in the New Orleans Metro area, which is comprised of 12 parishes, both candidates got 42 percent support and 11 percent of voters were undecided. 

In the two other regions of the state that were polled, Trump got at least 60 percent of the votes and Clinton had at least 25 percent. 

"Louisiana, for the foreseeable future, is a Republican stronghold in presidential elections and it will take a long time for that inertia to change," Engster said. 

In fact, 88 percent of Republican voters polled say they are voting for Trump, but so are 32 percent of Democrats surveyed, as well as 50 percent of independent voters.

Clinton is struggling to shore up support among her base as only 57 percent of Democrats told pollsters they are voting for the Democratic candidate. Just 3 percent of Republicans said they plan to cross party lines. Clinton also gets the support of 29 percent of those registered as independents.

"It's very hard for a Democrat running for president to do well in Louisiana," Engster said. 

Breaking it down by gender, Trump wins both men and women voters as 61 percent of men said they will vote for the businessman. Meanwhile, 29 percent of men choose Clinton. 

Despite recent controversies about his treatment of women, Trump has more female supporters than Clinton with 47 percent saying they will pick him and 39 percent siding with Clinton. 

"Doesn't appear that Donald Trump's remarks over the last few weeks have hurt him in Louisiana, and they probably have not hurt him in many Southern states, but in other states, particularly swing states which will determine the election, it appears to have hurt him," Engster said. 

According to this latest poll, Trump would get 75 percent of the white vote compared to Hillary's 12 percent.

Among black voters who responded to the survey, 89 percent plan to cast their vote for Clinton and only 2 percent said they would vote for Trump. 

"We've become a Red State and some people thought that the numbers that Barack Obama received in Louisiana, less than 20 percent of the white vote, that those were related to him being black. Well, Hillary Clinton is obviously not an African American and she's about where he was. So it appears to be more of a party or ideological thing than a racial thing," Engster said. 

With 19 days until the election, only nine percent of voters statewide said they're undecided.

The poll was conducted by Mason-Dixon Polling and Research. The margin of error for the poll was less than four points.

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