OUR TURN: Flood Task Force - WAFB 9 News Baton Rouge, Louisiana News, Weather, Sports

OUR TURN: Flood Task Force

BATON ROUGE, LA (WAFB) -

A few weeks ago, Governor John Bel Edwards challenged the members of the new Restore Louisiana Task Force to be bold and innovative as they devise a plan on how to handle flood restoration.

As it turns out, they need to be bold, innovative and speedy. The task force was visited last week by members of Louisiana’s congressional delegation and they delivered the message loud and clear that if our state wants to receive a lot more federal aid to help our flood recovery, our chances will be greatly enhanced if we have a sound plan that details how the money will be spent.

Governor Edwards had hoped that the state would receive $2.8 billion in federal aid, but so far we’ve only gotten what officials are terming a "down payment" of $438 million. Congress reconvenes on November 14, so time is of the essence. Hurricane Matthew also caused a massive amount of damage on the East Coast, so Louisiana will not be the only state asking for help. We wish our task force Godspeed.
 
That's "Our Turn." Now, it's your turn. To comment on this segment or anything else, visit us on Facebook or send an email to yourturn@wafb.com.

Copyright 2016 WAFB. All rights reserved.

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