YOUR TURN: Mike the Tiger and Tony the Tiger - WAFB 9 News Baton Rouge, Louisiana News, Weather, Sports

YOUR TURN: Mike the Tiger and Tony the Tiger

Source: WAFB Source: WAFB
BATON ROUGE, LA (WAFB) -

This week's Your Turn segment goes to Devin Guidry.

Guidry is one of many people who was saddened by the death of Mike VI, LSU's beloved tiger mascot, who died after a battle with cancer. Guidry wrote to tell us that he is leading a petition movement to have Mike replace with  another tiger he is concerned about. In Guidry's words:

"Tony the Tiger at the Tiger Truck stop towards Lafayette would be a great choice to take the spot of the next Mike. He lived in terrible conditions right now and I feel like instead of finding another tiger somewhere else to replace our beloved Mike, that rescuing Tony would be a better option. I decided to start a petition to try and get this idea going and to convince the truck stop owner to hand over Tony and bring the idea up to the university. Let's give Tony to LSU as the next Mike and save Tony from his miserable life."

That's Devin Guidry's turn. Now it’s your turn. To comment on this segment or anything else, visit us on Facebook or send an email to yourturn@wafb.com.

Copyright 2016 WAFB. All rights reserved.

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