Breaux Bridge cock fighting investigation busts 3 suspects, resc - WAFB 9 News Baton Rouge, Louisiana News, Weather, Sports

Breaux Bridge cock fighting investigation busts 3 suspects, rescues about 300 animals

Brandon Cormier (Source: St. Martin Parish Sheriff's Office) Brandon Cormier (Source: St. Martin Parish Sheriff's Office)
Dallas Grossie (Source: St. Martin Parish Sheriff's Office) Dallas Grossie (Source: St. Martin Parish Sheriff's Office)
Patrick Shelly (Source: St. Martin Parish Sheriff's Office) Patrick Shelly (Source: St. Martin Parish Sheriff's Office)
(Source: St. Martin Parish Sheriff's Office) (Source: St. Martin Parish Sheriff's Office)
(Source: St. Martin Parish Sheriff's Office) (Source: St. Martin Parish Sheriff's Office)
BREAUX BRIDGE, LA (WAFB) -

A Breaux Bridge bust resulted in three arrests at a home on Nanny Road.

St. Martin Parish deputies walked into the yard and house with a search warrant and knew they were looking for evidence of cock fighting.  They may have been surprised by the scope of what they allegedly saw.

Three men were hauled away in handcuffs as deputies called in experts. The St. Martin Parish Animal Coordinator, St. Martin and St. Landry Animal Control teams, and Dr. Jackie Simon carefully organized the seizure of 48 roosters.

Deputies say “approximately” 300 hens and chicks were found at the residence.

Investigators took pictures of a wooden round platform with a wire cage on it that looked like it would rotate with one or more birds inside.  And the roosters, all in fighting condition, were kept in individual cages to prevent injury.

Those cages lined a dirt floor that appeared to be the make-shift arena for training or for the fights themselves. Two of the three men arrested face a different level of allegations.

Dallas Grossie, 30, of Butte La Rose, and Brandon Cormier, 28, of Breaux Bridge, are facing 24 counts of cock fighting and cruelty to animals.

Patrick Stelly, 50, from Washington, Louisiana, is facing twice as many charges, 48 counts of cock fighting and cruelty.  That is one charge for each of the 48 roosters.

Authorities make this bust while a relatively new law is in effect for cock-fighting.  In 2014, Governor Bobby Jindal signed into law a bill that broadened the enforcement powers of lawmen. The old law had named specific breeds of chickens, and was way too technical for undercover work and the footwork needed to make a cock-fighting bust.

The new law means you can’t fight any bird. The chicken fighting is done with razor sharp spurs that are placed on the back of the birds’ ankles. They fight usually spatters blood everywhere as money changes hands betting on which bird will survive the fight.

Now, three men are the ones in cages under persecution, and the birds are in the hands of animal welfare experts and activists.

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