Common Core survey: What's in a name? - WAFB 9 News Baton Rouge, Louisiana News, Weather, Sports

Common Core survey: What's in a name?

Source: WAFB Source: WAFB
Source: WAFB Source: WAFB
BATON ROUGE, LA (WAFB) -

The battle over Common Core has gotten more complicate with a new survey put out by LSU. The survey indicates that the biggest problem people have with Common Core may be the name.

The statewide poll shows 51% of people are against the name "Common Core" and 39% are for it. However, if you take away the name, 67% percent like the standards and only 27% are against.

When broken down by parties, 71% Republicans and 72% of Democrats are in favor of the new curriculum if you don't call it Common Core. 

BESE chairman and Republican Chas Roemer said he will go along with anything just as long as students are prepared.

"Now, if you call that Common Core, Louisiana core, makes no difference to me. We need to make sure we have high standards, and the standards that we currently have in place are much better standards that we had previously," said Roemer.

Those high standards, he said, allow kids a shot to compete in Louisiana's workforce. Common Core and increased standards were big topics at a meeting of 100 top business leaders in Baton Rouge Tuesday.

"I need people to have writing skills, to be able to think creatively and to be able to solve problems. That's really what I want, and Common Core standards builds that individual," said Dr. Phillip Rozeman, a cardiologist from North Louisiana.

Copyright 2015 WAFB. All rights reserved.

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