British prime minister calls for tougher terror laws in the U.K. - WAFB 9 News Baton Rouge, Louisiana News, Weather, Sports

British prime minister calls for tougher terror laws in the U.K.

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British Prime Minister David Cameron calls for tougher legislation to track ISIS supporters. (Source: CNN) British Prime Minister David Cameron calls for tougher legislation to track ISIS supporters. (Source: CNN)
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LONDON (CNN) - The terror threat in the United Kingdom is at the second-highest level after recent ISIS activities in Iraq and Syria.

Now the prime minister is announcing steps to try to keep Isis fighters of British descent out of the country.

"Passports are not an automatic right," said Prime Minister David Cameron.

Cameron is calling for a new law to keep British-born jihadists operating in Syria and Iraq out of the United Kingdom.

"We will introduce specific and targeted legislation to fill this gap by providing the police with a temporary power to seize a passport at the border, during which time they will be able to investigate the individual concerned," Cameron said.

Also announced: increased measures to allow British authorities to better track suspected supporters of ISIS.

Making the point that airlines will have to comply with a no-fly list and share passenger names. If they don't, they won't be allowed to land in the U.K.

In the wake of American journalist James Foley's brutal killing, investigators have focused on some ISIS fighters from certain western countries like the U.S. and U.K.

Seen in the video, a masked man who may have carried out Foley's beheading.

He had an apparent English accent.

"You had 500 people travel from the U.K. To join jihadist groups. In the United States, that number is 100 with a dozen or so joining ISIS. So the threat is much greater in the U.K. And that's why you are seeing a raft of new measures in the U.K," said Paul Cruickshank, a terrorism analyst for CNN.

There are some calling for a similar plan here in the U.S., but so far no measures have been taken.

On Friday, the White House said there are no plans to raise the terror threat level in the U.S. any time soon.

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