Common core issue puts parents at a standstill - WAFB 9 News Baton Rouge, Louisiana News, Weather, Sports

Common core issue puts parents at a standstill

Posted: Updated:
Common Core  (Source: WAFB) Common Core (Source: WAFB)
BATON ROUGE, LA (WAFB) -

A meeting to discuss the future of Common Core testing in Louisiana is scheduled Thursday afternoon between Gov. Bobby Jindal and State Superintendent of Education John White.

Until an agreement is reached, parents like Nikki Dangerfield can only wait. Dangerfield says she hasn't been able to use the summer months to help her children prepare during the summer months the way she has in the past.

“In order for the kids to get a jump start it's easier knowing what is coming ahead than it is coming inside blindsided. Of course they're going to have some sort of curriculum. but we just need to know which one it's going to be,” said Dangerfield.

The scheduled meeting between Jindal and White comes after months of publicized disagreements between the two on the implementation of the Common Core curriculum. The rift centers on standardized testing and which group will come up with the questions on those tests.

In a letter sent Wednesday to Jindal's office, the Louisiana Board of Elementary and Secondary Education stated the board has been more than willing to work with the governor on his issues with Common Core.

BESE also says in the letter that its leaders and the Department of Education should be the groups picking questions for standardized tests, but Commissioner of Administration Kristy Nichols said in a conference call Wednesday putting those tests out to bid to vendors should be an important part of the plan.

“They think procurement is just this big bureaucratic slow down process designed to hurt the testing process which is really not true. The real intent is to create a competitive process that gives you the best vendor for any procurement,” said Nichols.

Dangerfield says the back and forth seems unnecessary and adds both sides should have their sights set on the children they serve.

“Look at the children, the parents and all as concerned parents so we can see what's going to happen. Take the politics out of it and focus on what these children actually need for the upcoming school year,” said Dangerfield.

Copyright 2014 WAFB. All rights reserved.

 

Powered by WorldNow