Judge strikes down Kentucky's gay marriage ban - WAFB 9 News Baton Rouge, Louisiana News, Weather, Sports

Judge strikes down Kentucky's gay marriage ban

BRETT BARROUQUERE
Associated Press
    
LOUISVILLE, Ky. (AP) - A federal judge in Kentucky has struck down the state's ban on same-sex couples getting licenses and marrying in the state.
    
However, Tuesday's ruling was temporarily put on hold because it will be appealed, meaning it is not yet clear when same-sex couples could be issued marriage licenses.
    
U.S. District Judge John G. Heyburn in Louisville concluded in Tuesday's ruling that the state's prohibition on same-sex couples being wed violates the Equal Protection Clause of the U.S. Constitution by treating gay couples differently than straight couples.
    
Heyburn previously struck down Kentucky's ban on recognizing same-sex marriages from other states and countries, but put the implementation of that ruling on hold. That decision did not deal with whether Kentucky would have to issue marriage licenses to same-sex couples.

(Copyright 2014 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.)

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