Clarksville schools to make up only 1 of 5 snow days - WAFB 9 News Baton Rouge, Louisiana News, Weather, Sports

Clarksville schools to make up only 1 of 5 snow days

CLARKSVILLE, TN (WSMV) -

The Clarksville-Montgomery County school system has decided to forgo four of their five snow days after the area was hit hard by ice earlier this month.

"I actually think it's a great idea to continue on with the school days as they are and just make up that one day," said owner of the Holiday Barber Shop Thomas Edwards. "It's not a good idea to punish kids for things that are beyond their control."

Since 1967, Holiday Barber Shop has been steeped in tradition, complete with classic striped pole and bowl of candy for anyone stopping in for a shave and a haircut. Edwards said no one loves helping out the family business more than his two Barkers Mill Elementary children.

"My daughter considers herself the unofficial janitor," laughed Edwards.

That's why he's glad to hear his children won't be going to school on any Saturdays or during spring break to make up snow days.

"If you have to go, you end up doing nothing on those days," said Edwards. "It's not part of a normal curriculum in the school system."

Just weeks ago, with water dripping from thawing ice downtown and crews shoveling the streets, Clarksville-Montgomery County Schools canceled class for a full five days.

Tuesday night, the school board voted that children won't have to make up four of those five snow days.

"Basically, we already built enough time into our school calendar that we're allowed to miss up to five days," said schools spokeswoman Elise Shelton.

Shelton added they're still meeting the minimum school days required by the state. They are making up one snow day by going an extra 30 minutes from April 7 through the April 24.

"It's not required by the state, but we expect our students to be in class as much as possible and have the experience of learning before they're tested on the material," said Shelton.

With the pole turning outside the shop and customers kicked back in their seats, Edwards said he's more than happy his kids will have that time to help business keep buzzing along.

"I can't explain how happy it makes them to come down here and just be part of something," said Edwards.

Copyright 2014 WSMV (Meredith Corporation). All rights reserved.

  • Trending StoriesTrending StoriesMore>>

  • Parents make heartbreaking decision over son with autism

    Parents make heartbreaking decision over son with autism

    Wednesday, May 24 2017 11:10 AM EDT2017-05-24 15:10:16 GMT
    KMOV has chosen not to identify him by name or show pictures of what he currently looks like. (Credit: Wallens)KMOV has chosen not to identify him by name or show pictures of what he currently looks like. (Credit: Wallens)

    A parent's love knows no bounds. But what happens when you truly believe your child is going to harm himself or someone else? One family tells News 4 they made a heartbreaking decision about their son with autism, all because they felt they had no other options. 

    More >>

    A parent's love knows no bounds. But what happens when you truly believe your child is going to harm himself or someone else? One family tells News 4 they made a heartbreaking decision about their son with autism, all because they felt they had no other options. 

    More >>
  • Breaking

    Kirbyville High School principal resigns, then shoots, kills self in parking lot

    Kirbyville High School principal resigns, then shoots, kills self in parking lot

    Wednesday, May 24 2017 11:31 AM EDT2017-05-24 15:31:33 GMT

    Following his resignation Tuesday afternoon, the principal of Kirbyville High School walked out his truck, where he apparently shot and killed himself, according to police.

    More >>

    Following his resignation Tuesday afternoon, the principal of Kirbyville High School walked out his truck, where he apparently shot and killed himself, according to police.

    More >>
  • Deadly virus threatens local crawfish industry

    Deadly virus threatens local crawfish industry

    Tuesday, May 23 2017 7:26 PM EDT2017-05-23 23:26:19 GMT

    A deadly virus is threatening the crawfish industry in Southwest Louisiana. It's called white spot syndrome virus and it was first discovered in Thailand, but somehow it made its way to ponds in South Louisiana and specialists are struggling to find the funds to research a solution.  “The catch was increasing and increasing and then it dropped 70% and that's when you saw the dead crawfish floating in the water,” said a crawfish farmer of 34 years, Ian Garbarino. He...

    More >>

    A deadly virus is threatening the crawfish industry in Southwest Louisiana. It's called white spot syndrome virus and it was first discovered in Thailand, but somehow it made its way to ponds in South Louisiana and specialists are struggling to find the funds to research a solution.  “The catch was increasing and increasing and then it dropped 70% and that's when you saw the dead crawfish floating in the water,” said a crawfish farmer of 34 years, Ian Garbarino. He...

    More >>
Powered by Frankly