Memories of JFK shared by cartoonist's son - WAFB 9 News Baton Rouge, Louisiana News, Weather, Sports

Memories of JFK shared by cartoonist's son, illustrations featured in museum

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Louisville cartoonist Hugh Haynie's work was featured in newspapers and magazines across the country and in Louisville. Louisville cartoonist Hugh Haynie's work was featured in newspapers and magazines across the country and in Louisville.
Kennedy was often depicted in Haynie's images and would even request the original artwork. Kennedy was often depicted in Haynie's images and would even request the original artwork.
Not every politician was a fan of Haynie's exaggerated characteristics, but JFK respected his work. Not every politician was a fan of Haynie's exaggerated characteristics, but JFK respected his work.
Judge Hugh Smith Haynie Judge Hugh Smith Haynie

LOUISVILLE, KY (WAVE) - For decades his editorial cartoons showcased satire in American politics.

Louisville cartoonist Hugh Haynie's work was featured in newspapers and magazines across the country and in Louisville.

Haynie never shied away from controversial subject matter. That didn't bother President John F. Kennedy who valued Haynie's opinion on current events.

"JFK embodied what dad wanted to see a politician be," Judge Hugh Smith Haynie said, a Jefferson County Family Court judge.

Haynie's son, who prefers to go by Smith, spent the day with WAVE 3 News at the Frazier Museum where an exhibit displays his father's cartoon commentary on the events that defined our nation.

Kennedy was often depicted in those images and would even request the original artwork.

"Kennedy loved how dad drew his hair. He always used to say, 'if it weren't for my hair you couldn't draw me.' My dad was always like oh you're too good looking," Smith said.

Not every politician was a fan of Haynie's exaggerated characteristics, but JFK respected his work. They became almost immediate friends when Smith's father had a chance encounter with Senator Kennedy in 1960.

"He had dad's cartoons along one of the walls of the aisles leading to the oval office. As the years went by, my father visited the White House several times." So often, that a young Smith Haynie said he ran off in the Kennedy White House and eluded Secret Service agents.

"At one moment, the Secret Service looked at my father and said, 'Haynie do you have a small boy?' My dad is like, 'Yes, he's right here.' And dad said he just looked down the hallway and he sees the door to the oval office open and two agents standing there looking perplexed. I'm rocking in Kennedy's famous rocking chair. Kennedy just started bursting out laughing. And that was the thing about him, he made everyone comfortable. everybody loved him," Smith said.

Those who admired the 35th President included the Louisville cartoonist who never hesitated to create thought-provoking images of JFK, but November 22, 1963 would change Haynie and the nation forever.

"That day when Kennedy was killed fundamentally changed my father," Smith said.

Hugh Haynie's illustrations are forever sketched into history and featured at the Frazier Museum's exhibit, Hugh Haynie: The Art of Opinion.

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