Speed camera tickets piling up, quickly - WAFB 9 News Baton Rouge, Louisiana News, Weather, Sports

Speed camera tickets piling up, quickly

Portable speed cameras racking up tickets Portable speed cameras racking up tickets

A 19 Action News investigation has found more than 4,300 tickets have been filed in the first month since the City of Cleveland started using portable speed cameras.

The cameras are popping up all over Cleveland. They're snapping pictures of speeders for tickets with fines starting at $100.

The Cleveland City Clerk's Office says for the first month, the city has filed 4,361 tickets, just from speed cameras.

But city hall says,  those cameras actually snapped more than 14,000 pictures. Thousands were thrown out because pictures were blurry or because of improper signs near the cameras the first day.

But, just the fines for the tickets filed would bring in nearly a half million dollars.

The city's had stationary traffic cameras, and the number of drivers busted by them has been steadily dropping. Yet this year, they've already brought in $3.3 million.

The city says traffic cameras are in place to make drivers slow down and be careful. Though, no one we talked to is buying that.

One driver shook her head and said, "Just to make money. Just to make money."

Another said, "I don't think it's good.  I think it's bad."

And, if you don't pay the ticket in 3 weeks, you get hit with late fees.

So, watch out. The cameras get moved about every two weeks. Already more have been added. Now, Cleveland has 12 portable speed cameras.

Copyright 2013 woio. All rights reserved.

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