Getting the details on the 'Detail Doctor' - WAFB 9 News Baton Rouge, Louisiana News, Weather, Sports

Getting the details on the 'Detail Doctor'

LOUISVILLE, KY (WAVE) - You've probably seen this product on TV commercials the last several months. It's called the Detail Doctor, and it's suppose to take the trim of your car that's already sun washed out and bring it back to brand new, showroom new as a matter of fact. This week I'm going to Try It Before You Buy It.

The commercial claims "with just one application you can restore your ride's deep rich color, not for days but up to one full year!"

The Detail Doctor says it can be used on all sorts of things such as bed liners, bumpers, door handles and more. I tried the product on the dingy front bumper of my truck. I applied just a small amount of Detail Doctor to a rag and began wiping away. After a few minutes, sure enough it does bring the molding back to its original dark color! The product has a strong sweet smell to it, so be sure to keep it away from your kids and pets as you should do with any chemical.

After the testing of Detail Doctor it appears to work well. But keep in mind - time will always be the deciding factor. If this new car look lasts several months, then it's a good buy. I'll give you a follow up update in a couple of months.

One important thing to point out about this product is the fact it can be very dangerous. On the front cover it says it can cause spontaneous combustion. Not of you, of course, but any rag or sponge you put it on. So be very careful and make sure you read the directions before you use this product.

I found Detail Doctor at a Dollar General store for $15. You can also find it online.

So does it work? So far it does a pretty decent job. But again, I'll update the final test results in a couple of months.

Copyright 2013 WAVE News. All rights reserved.

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