Gigi's for Babies raises more than $3,000 for March of Dimes - WAFB 9 News Baton Rouge, Louisiana News, Weather, Sports

Gigi's for Babies raises more than $3,000 for March of Dimes

(Source: WSFA 12) (Source: WSFA 12)
(Source: WSFA 12 News) (Source: WSFA 12 News)
(Source: Jone's family: Hailey and her mom Alisha) (Source: Jone's family: Hailey and her mom Alisha)
MONTGOMERY, AL (WSFA) -

The totals are in for the 3rd Annual Gigi's for Babies fundraising event, benefiting babies through March of Dimes. 

On Wednesday the Gigi's for Babies event, held from 7 a.m. to 10 a.m., raised more than three thousand dollars for March of Dimes. All of the money raised will go to help March of Dime's mission of preventing birth defects, premature birth and infant mortality.

The ambassador family for this year's event, featuring little 3-year-old Hailey Jones, born premature, spent the morning on site as people contributed to the cause and picked up their cupcakes.

"We thank God for the March of Dimes," Hailey's parents James and Alisha say. "If it wasn't for them and many other babies, she wouldn't be here with us today. As tiny as a wedding band is, her hand fit through the whole thing, so the fact that she is walking around with no issues or problems, we're blessed."

Over the past three years, more than 15,000 dollars have been raised for the March of Dimes. 

Copyright 2015 WSFA 12 News. All rights reserved.

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