Boston bombing suspect in custody - WAFB 9 News Baton Rouge, Louisiana News, Weather, Sports

Boston Marathon bombing suspect in custody after massive manhunt

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Residents of Watertown, MA, took to the streets in celebration that the second bombing suspect was captured. (Source: WCVB/CNN) Residents of Watertown, MA, took to the streets in celebration that the second bombing suspect was captured. (Source: WCVB/CNN)
Photos of the two suspects were released early Friday morning as the confrontation Watertown was occurring. (Source: FBI) Photos of the two suspects were released early Friday morning as the confrontation Watertown was occurring. (Source: FBI)
Police gather surround a home in Watertown, MA where the suspect was hiding in the backyard. (Source: CNN) Police gather surround a home in Watertown, MA where the suspect was hiding in the backyard. (Source: CNN)
This boat is where police believe the second suspect is hiding. (Source: Google) This boat is where police believe the second suspect is hiding. (Source: Google)
An FBI photo of 19-year-old Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, a suspect in the Boston bombing. (Source: Boston Police Department) An FBI photo of 19-year-old Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, a suspect in the Boston bombing. (Source: Boston Police Department)

WATERTOWN, MA (RNN) - Amid cheers and applause, law enforcement officials took the second Boston Marathon bombing suspect into custody Friday night. The first suspect died in a gunfight in the early hours of Friday morning.

"We're exhausted, but we have a victory here tonight," said Col. Timothy Alben, superintendent of the Massachusetts State Police, at a news conference after a massive mobilization of law enforcement and a daylong manhunt.

Residents streamed into the street in celebration, chanting, "Let's go Boston!" and "U.S.A!" after an emotional five-day search for two brothers, Dzhokhar A. Tsarnaev, 19, and Tamerlan Tsarnaev, 26, who allegedly placed bombs at the finish line of the Boston Marathon.

"We've closed an important chapter in this tragedy," President Barack Obama said in an address to the nation.

Obama urged Americans to allow the judicial system to work, and emphasized that what makes this country and the city of Boston great is the willingness to welcome people from around the world.

The president praised the work by law enforcement, and expressed gratitude to the people of Boston who helped in the search for the two brothers.

The search ended at a home in Watertown, MA, after a Dave Henneberry called 911 when he saw a trail of blood leading to a boat on a trailer in the backyard of a his home.

"He walked outside and saw blood on the boat. ... He lifted the tarp and saw a man covered with blood," Boston Police Commissioner Ed Davis said. "We set up a perimeter around the boat … we exchanged gunfire with the suspect inside the boat."

Davis said the suspect's wounds were probably from the police pursuit and gunfight the night before when the brothers exchanged gunfire and threw bombs at police. Tamerlan Tsarnaev was fatally wounded in that exchange.

No explosives were found at the scene of the arrest. Police used a robot to remove the tarp from the boat.

Gov. Deval Patrick thanked the public for helping the investigation, especially in submitting photos and videos of the scene of the Monday bombing near the finish line that claimed three lives and injured more than 170 people.

He also noted the interagency cooperation - from various police departments to the state police to the FBI that worked together on the Joint Terrorism Task Force.

A police car carrying the suspect exited the scene at 8:45 p.m. ET. The suspect was then transferred to an ambulance. Dzhokhar Tsarnaev was labeled Suspect 2 by the FBI, and was shown wearing a white hat at the scene of the bombing in photographs released to the public on Thursday.

CNN reports that three additional people from Bedford, MA have been taken into custody for questioning.

Boston Mayor Tom Menino got on the police radio to tell police, "Your mayor is very proud of you."

Dzhokhar Tsarnaev is in serious condition at Mount Auburn Hospital, the same location where Massachusetts Bay Transit Authority officer Richard Donohue Jr., 33, was taken. Donohue was shot in the pursuit of the pair, who fled from Cambridge to nearby Watertown.

Police say the chase started after the brothers shot and killed 26-year-old Sean Collier, a campus police officer at Massachusetts of Technology.

A neighborhood in chaos

Bob Goodwin, who lives three houses away from where the suspect was hiding, was at the marathon Monday when the bombs exploded 12 seconds apart.

"I was about 10 yards away from the second bomb explosion," Goodwin told CNN. "We were recovering from Monday, and then this was like a retraumatization of the event."

Goodwin went for a walk in what he described as a close-knit neighborhood at about 6 p.m. when he saw about 25 police cars "screeching down the street," followed shortly thereafter by tactical teams.

The suspect was discovered about 30 minutes after police held a news conference lifting the city lockdown. Dozens of police, emergency and armored vehicles and fire trucks sped to the scene.

Police trained floodlights on the boat on a trailer near a garage in the backyard of a house, and witnesses heard about 15 explosions as they fired flash bang grenades to flush out the suspect. Flash bangs, designed to stun a suspect, produce a loud noise and bright light.

Officials wanted to capture Dzhokhar Tsarnaev alive so he could be questioned about the marathon bombings. He was taken alive after a tense standoff.

The escape and the death of a brother

Dzhokhar Tsarnaev got away after the first gunfight when he backed the stolen vehicle over his older brother, Tamerlan Tsarnaev, and fled on foot. The older brother, Tamerlan Tsarnaev, 26, was in cardiac arrest by the time authorities got him to the Beth Israel Hospital emergency room, where doctors soon pronounced him dead.

Two years ago, Tamerlan Tsarnaev was interviewed by the FBI at the request of a foreign government the Bureau would not identify. The brothers come from a Muslim background, and though no incriminating evidence came from the interview, their mother said her older son was "persecuted" by the FBI.

As they mounted the unprecedented manhunt, officials shut down all of Boston, Watertown and the surrounding area while they went door-to-door looking for the surviving suspect.

They were afraid he might have on an explosive vest - his brother had explosives strapped to his body when he died. CNN also reported that police found homemade explosives during searches Friday, and experts performed controlled detonations throughout the day.

'Who can do this stuff?'

The two brothers were legal residents of the U.S. originally from a Russian region near Chechnya. Their uncle, Ruslan Tsarni, urged his nephew to turn himself in.

"Ask for forgiveness from the victims, from the injured and from those who loved them," Tsarni said outside his home in Montgomery County, MD.

Alvi Tsarni, another uncle to the suspects, told WBZ they have been in the U.S. since 2000 or 2001.

"It's crazy; it's not possible," said Tsarni of the suspected actions. "When I saw this on TV news, I said, ‘Who can do this stuff?'"

The younger brother was on scholarship at UMass-Dartmouth. CNN reported he moved to the U.S. with family at the age of 9 and became a naturalized citizen less than eight months ago, on Sept. 11.

Former high school classmates said Dzhokhar Tsarnaev was a normal teen who went to parties and was captain of the wrestling team. However, many of the friends said they hadn't spoken to him in a year or more.

Tamerlan Tsarnaev was a former Golden Gloves boxer who hoped to make the Olympics team. He was studying to become an engineer at Bunker Hill Community College. He has a 3-year-old daughter, and it is unclear if he is married to the child's mother.

After the capture, Boston Police tweeted a brief message asking that the victims of the blast be remembered.

Those killed include 8-year-old Martin Richard. The boy's 6-year-old sister lost a leg in the attack, and his mother suffered a brain injury. More than 170 people were injured and many had to have limbs amputated.

Krystle M. Campbell, 29, from Medford, MA, and Lu Lingzi, a 23-year-old graduate student at Boston University, also died in the explosions at the finish line of the Boston Marathon.

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