Man dies after leading police on high speed chase in Webster Par - WAFB 9 News Baton Rouge, Louisiana News, Weather, Sports

Man dies after leading police on high speed chase in Webster Parish

WEBSTER PARISH, LA (KSLA) -

A man is dead after leading police on a high speed chase in Webster Parish Sunday night.

Minden police responded just before 9 p.m. to a report of a reckless driver. When police spotted the car and attempted to make a traffic stop, the driver sped off. The driver was heading north on US 79 as he led police on the chase before he lost control while turning into a curve. Police say the driver crossed the center line and lost control of the car swerving off the right side of the roadway.

The car crashed into a ditch and hit an embankment before flipping several times back onto the roadway.

Louisiana State Police identified the driver as 44-year-old Tony Burns of Haynesville. Burns was ejected from the car during the crash. He was pronounced dead at the scene by the Webster Parish Coroner's Office. Burns was the only person in the car.

The coroner's office has taken a toxicology sample to determine if Burns had been drinking.

Detectives say they are not sure why Burns was attempting to evade police and are still investigating.

Copyright 2013 KSLA. All rights reserved.

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