Man invents mailbox blinking lights for first responders - WAFB 9 News Baton Rouge, Louisiana News, Weather, Sports

Man invents mailbox blinking lights for first responders

Earl Berry invented a set of blinking lights for the mailbox. Earl Berry invented a set of blinking lights for the mailbox.
UNION GROVE, AL (WAFF) -

A Union Grove man hopes his invention will help first responders quickly locate emergencies.

Earl Berry invented a set of blinking lights for the mailbox.

He said it will easily alert first responders who may have a hard time finding your house in an emergency situation, especially in the dark.

Berry saw this while working with the volunteer fire department years ago, and realized it's a problem.

"And this will take care of that because if you could get on the street or the block, then naturally you'll find the mailbox, and if you find the mailbox, then there will be a light that will be signing off the house, and it will be showing where you're going," said Berry.

Berry's invention is patent-pending.

He hopes it will be available to purchase soon.

Copyright 2013 WAFF. All rights reserved.

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