Editorial comments: Tutwiler abuse - WAFB 9 News Baton Rouge, Louisiana News, Weather, Sports

Editorial comments: Tutwiler abuse

Source: WBRC Source: WBRC

The following are comments to an editorial from FOX6 WBRC-TV General Manager Lou Kirchen, first aired on Tuesday, Jan. 29.

Sakeena, Talladega

Something needs to be done. Because it's not fair. They come in and they are trying to get rehabilitated to get them back on their feet, to be better citizens of the United States. They shouldn't be mistreated.

Ken, Irondale

It's amazing that in the 21st Century and even in the past few years with women's liberation that it has taken so long for evil perpetrated by the guards to come to light. Especially when we live in a time when equal work for equal pay. It seems the most downtrodden women are the last to get any help.

Mrs. Pugh

And Lou, I just I agree with you. I think it's a crying shame that this happened in any prison. And no one can tell me that they did not know what was going on.

Brenda, Fairfield

I feel like the guards should be punished in a way just like anyone else that's on the street.

Damian, Birmingham

Just because the people are inmates in the prison, I think that they should be treated just like any other citizen of the United States. They should have stricter laws that when they are hiring the police officer and they should have better camera systems. Just cause they're inmates, they are still people and they still have feelings and souls and everything.

Thank you for your interest in this week's editorial. We look forward to hearing more comments from you on future issues.

Copyright 2013 WBRC. All rights reserved.

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