Public to weigh in on fate of Sandy Hook Elementary - WAFB 9 News Baton Rouge, Louisiana News, Weather, Sports

Public to weigh in on fate of Sandy Hook Elementary

NEWTOWN, CT (WFSB) -

In the wake of last month's deadly shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, the town will continue a series of public conversations about what to do with the building.

A meeting is set for 8:30 p.m. in the lecture hall of Newtown High School.

The public will have a chance to weigh in on whether to demolish the school or use the building for something else.

Depending on the attendance at the meeting, another meeting could be added on Jan. 25 at the Newtown High School at 7 p.m.

Sandy Hook Elementary School remains closed because it is still a crime scene. Students from Sandy Hook will finish the school year out at the former Chalk Hill Middle School in Monroe.

Eyewitness News talked to several Newtown residents on what they would like to see.

"I personally think it should be knocked down and maybe a park built there," said Christy Fogelstrom. "Such a horrible thing happened and I don't know how parents could send their kids back there and I think something really nice should be done with the space."

Others have a different idea.

"I think they should still use it because if they didn't it's like he took the school from us," said Mary Vodola.

Adam Lanza shot and killed his mother at their home, then went to Sandy Hook Elementary School and killed 26 children and adults on Dec. 14.

Copyright 2013 WFSB (Meredith Corporation). All rights reserved.

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