Zaxby's warns customers of potential fraud - WAFB 9 News Baton Rouge, Louisiana News, Weather, Sports

Zaxby's warns customers of potential fraud

ATHENS, Ga. (AP) - A Georgia-based restaurant firm says suspicious computer files have been found at some of its locations, prompting it to warn customers about the potential for fraud.

Zaxby's Franchising Inc. said in a statement that the suspicious files may have resulted in unauthorized access to credit and debit card information at more than 100 stores.

The Athens-based firm says the affected stores are in Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, Mississippi and Virginia.

Company officials say the issue involves malware files, which could have been used to export guest names and credit and debit card numbers. The company says it notified law enforcement of the potential criminal activity. Zaxby's says a forensic investigation hasn't determined whether credit or debit card data left the processing systems of any stores.

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