Isaac evacuees arrive in Shreveport - WAFB 9 News Baton Rouge, Louisiana News, Weather, Sports

Isaac evacuees arrive in Shreveport

SHREVEPORT, LA (KSLA) -

For Dena Jones and her family evacuating for Isaac is deja vu.

"We were here.   Right here," she said as she set up he cot in a racquet ball room on the LSU Shreveport campus.

Her family went to the exact same shelter, on the exact same date once before.

"With Katrina we evacuated on her birthday, 3 days before the storm on the 27th.   We evacuated yesterday on her birthday," said Jones.

Jones still has a lot of the same fears she did 7 years ago.

"I'm worried about the looting and my family members that I begged to come along with us that they said they're going to ride it out.   You know, like people did for Katrina.   They took a chance, and there were so many lives lost and tragic.   I'm kind of scared worrying about other people," she said.

"Lost everything in Katrina.   Everything.   I had to start all over," said her cousin Patrice Trent.

However, they say they learned some things from Katrina, too.

"Don't take a chance.   Go, you know.   It's worth it to just go, and if nothing happens we thank God, but to leave," said Jones.

They hope their deja vu ends here. They hope Isaac comes and passes and is nothing like what they call his "big sister" Katrina. At the same time, they know no matter what happens they've bounced back before. They can do it again.

"It prepared me.   It prepared me.   What don't kill you makes you stronger.   It prepared me," said Trent.

As of 6 p.m. on Tuesday 62 people had checked into the shelter at LSUS.  That shelter can hold 500-700 people.

Copyright 2012 KSLA. All rights reserved.

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