Residents Brace for Isaac - WAFB 9 News Baton Rouge, Louisiana News, Weather, Sports

Baton Rouge residents brace for Isaac

BATON ROUGE, LA (WAFB) -

Within hours of Governor Bobby Jindal's news conference Sunday updating the public on Tropical Storm Isaac, many families headed to the stores to stock up on water and supplies.

"We have to get it done," said Paul Anderson. "You want to be prepared and not stuck out in the last minute and wondering how you are going to get something, especially with small kids like we have."

However, not all of those who made the trip would be as lucky, with water flying off the shelves quicker than it could be stocked. Gas was a hot commodity as well. Mike Arbour was among some folks on Siegen Lane that beat the masses to the pump.

"Last time I got caught in about a four-hour wait for gasoline and this time I was certain I wasn't going to do that," Arbour said.

"This is the state of Louisiana," added Ben Zare of Baton Rouge. "These kinds of hurricanes come and go. It affects us five or seven days in a row business-wise and gas-wise, everything else."

Everything else could mean mandatory evacuations for thousands of residents. The orders will come down from individual parishes and Jindal urged for the word to come sooner rather than later.

"If parishes are going to call for mandatory evacuations, tomorrow morning would be the time to do it, in terms of giving people time to get out of harm's way," Jindal explained. "You really don't want to wait much longer than that."

Waiting was not an option for Anderson.

"It's worth it. I mean with small kids, whatever you have to do you have to do it."

Copyright 2012 WAFB. All rights reserved.

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