Bill proposes death row inmates income funneled to victim's fami - WAFB 9 News Baton Rouge, Louisiana News, Weather, Sports

Bill proposes death row inmates income funneled to victim's family

BATON ROUGE, LA (WAFB) -

Death row was on the agenda at the Legislature Tuesday; specifically, money that death row inmates could potentially earn from art work or a book.

Accused serial killer Derrick Todd Lee, the south Louisiana serial killer, had a sketch hit the internet.

That was what drove this legislation to be introduced.

Yvonne Dorsey-Colomb authored the measure. Her husband's daughter was a victim of Derrick Todd Lee. The bill allows any money or proceeds from anything to be funneled to the victim's family; but the inmate must be on death row.

"The bill provides for proceeds or profits received from a defendant on death row. It provides that they do not receive any funds from the notoriety of the crime they committed," said Dorsey-Colomb.

Angola Warden Burl Cain tells 9News that he has 86 people currently on death row and none of them are generating any income.

The measure also will not affect the arts and craft show the prison hosts annually.

Copyright 2012 WAFB. All rights reserved.

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