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Quiet Star

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Delahoussaye dives for a ball during a match . Credit:  Chris Parent Delahoussaye dives for a ball during a match . Credit: Chris Parent

By Rob Landry | LSU Student

Some athletes like to do their talking through the news media. Others prefer to voice their two-cents via social media.

LSU junior libero Sam Delahoussaye does her talking on the court.

She is not a fan of media interviews, preferring to remain silent when the recorders come out. But as soon as Delahoussaye steps on the volleyball court, her play is anything but silent.

She is third on the team with 179 digs and ranks fourth in total sets played with 83.

Her stats are good, but LSU coach Fran Flory finds that it's Delahoussaye's intangibles that are most valuable. "She's the key. She changes our demeanor when she steps on the court. We become a tougher team, we become feistier. When she brings that attitude our entire team feeds off of that."

Delahoussaye, a Madisonville native and St. Scholastica High School graduate, was one of just four players to play in all 107 sets for LSU in 2010.

"She's a veteran," said Flory. "We're a young team. She's been through it all. She's played in big matches. She's succeeded in big matches. And nothing speaks more to success than experiencing those situations. And she's experienced them and done very well."

Delahoussaye began playing volleyball when she was 13 on a club team. In high school, she garnered First Team All District honors along with being named district Co-MVP in 2008, and was recruited by LSU and Southern Mississippi. She never wavered on her first choice.

"I always wanted to come to LSU, even if I wasn't going to play volleyball. And once I started talking to the coaches here it was just a definite. I have a huge family and everyone comes here."

After arriving on campus, Delahoussaye quickly learned college volleyball was a different monster from what she was used to.

"I'm a completely different player. It's a different system. Different everything when you get to college, but it's more fun. The transition was hard but now that I'm used to it it's a ton of fun."

Flory, though, has seen the biggest change in Delahoussaye in the way she approaches the game mentally.

"She's an emotional player and she's learned to channel that drive and her desire. She spent most of her freshman year frustrated because she didn't know how to manage that. As the years have progressed, she's truly learned, and stepped into, how to use that as a positive to make positive touches instead of having it take her out of plays."

Wither her emotions and talents continuing to mature, Delahoussaye has become a true leader of the team.

"She's a veteran," said Flory. "We're a young team. She's been through it all. She's played in big matches, she's succeeded in big matches. And nothing speaks more to success than experiencing those situations. And she's experienced them and done very well."

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