Baton Rouge native killed in Hawaii - WAFB 9 News Baton Rouge, Louisiana News, Weather, Sports

Baton Rouge native killed in Hawaii

William Sublett and his wife William Sublett and his wife
KAHULUI, HI (WAFB) -

A murder mystery that spans 4,000 miles is underway. Police in Hawaii want to know who killed a Baton Rouge man and left his body on a Maui beach.

Investigators believe William Sublett, 57, was beaten to death.

Phone calls poured into the newsroom and everyone had nothing but great things to say about Sublett. 

His wife and several friends said the father of 11 was the most dedicated family man you could meet.

Sublett was reportedly employed in Hawaii while he worked toward earning a state nursing license. His wife and several children planned to join him in Maui at a later date.

Instead, they are grieving the loss of their father and husband. Like the police, they're trying to figure out what happened to him and why.

His friends also said Sublett was an active member at Healing Place Church in Baton Rouge. They added he was actually a part of a medical mission trip to Africa earlier this year. 

The family has a fund set up at Chase Bank called the "William Sublett Donation Fund" for people to donate money to help with funeral costs.


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