Trees at Toomer's Corner showing signs of poison - WAFB 9 News Baton Rouge, Louisiana News, Weather, Sports

Trees at Toomer's Corner showing signs of poison

By Toygar Ayla - email

AUBURN, AL (WTVM) – With the Iron Bowl just a handful of weeks away, many are worrying about the health of the iconic oaks at Toomer's Corner.

The picture on the top is what the trees looked like a few months ago and on the bottom, what they look like mid-October.

Auburn University officials are still monitoring the trees, watering them regularly and hand-removing any toilet paper after football celebrations.

They say the real test will be next spring to see if the trees can sprout any new growth.

Harvey Updyke allegedly poured lethal amounts of Spike 80DF on the trees at Toomer's Corner after last year Iron Bowl game, and then bragged about it in a radio broadcast.

News Leader 9 will continue following this story.

Copyright 2011 WTVM. All rights reserved.

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