BR Ecstasy Trial Making Legal History - WAFB 9 News Baton Rouge, Louisiana News, Weather, Sports

BR Ecstasy Trial Making Legal History

A jury has been seated in the second degree murder trial of Heather Smith. Smith has been charged in the death of Marsha Fisher, her best friend at the time, because they shared the drug ecstasy. This is a trial that is making legal history.

District Court Judge Don Johnson swore in his jury late Wednesday afternoon. The panel of seven women and five men will hear the details Thursday morning.

According to prosecutors, the alleged victim, Marsha Fisher, was taking the drug ecstacy with Heather Smith and Randall Corbett.  Things went terribly wrong on an August day in 2001 and Fisher died. The case has been in and out of courts for almost four years before the Louisiana Supreme Court ordered that it be tried.

Louisiana law says if you provide drugs to a person who dies, you can be charged with murder. Both sides are confident as testimony is about to begin. 

Defense attorney Bo Rougeo says, "I have seen all the evidence and I know what the evidence is.  I have talked to their experts and I have experts of my own, and they don't match up."

Prosecutor Darwin Miller says, "I feel confidant in this case and how it's going to be presented.  And I am sorry for the victim's family and that hopefully this will bring some closure to this chapter in their life."

Heather Smith and Marsha Fisher were very good friends. Fisher's boyfriend at the time, Randall Corbett is also facing second degree murder charges in this very unusual case.

Reporter:  Jim Shannon

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